2014-15 Series

SPEAKERS

Dr. Marlyn Andino is an Aerospace Research Engineer in the Flow Physics and Control Branch (FPCB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

Dr. Amanda Chou works as a Research Aerospace Engineer with the Flow Physics & Control Branch at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)

Dr. Eric Nielsen is a Senior Research Scientist with the Computational AeroSciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)

Dr. Manuel Pérez-Quiñones (Moderator) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science, and a member of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction at Virginia Tech

TITLE

MY journey and YOUR future at NASA

WHEN

Goodwin Hall, Room 244, Virginia Tech

WHERE

Spencer Center for Civic and Global Engagement, Mary Baldwin College, in Staunton, VA

HOST

School of Engineering, Virginia Tech

ABSTRACT

Three scientists from NASA Langley Research Center travel to Virginia Tech to participate in a conversation about their careers and their journeys and working at NASA. They will also share information about internships and other opportunities at NASA.

BIOS

Dr. Marlyn Andino’s primary area of expertise is active flow control (AFC). She holds a B.S in Mechanical Engineering from University of Puerto Rico, M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Syracuse University. She is an active member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Physical Society. She is also a strong supporter of K-12 outreach efforts and has given many inspirational talks on science and technology to local schools. 
 
Dr. Amanda Chou studies different mechanisms by which transition occurs on vehicles. She holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Virginia Tech, where she was a member of the Hillcrest Honors Community, Society of Women Engineers, and AIAA. She received an M.S. in Aeronautics & Astronautics and a Ph.D. in Aeronautics & Astronautics from Purdue University, where she was the recipient of a David M. Knox Fellowship, an NDSEG, an Amelia Earhart Fellowship, and a NASA Pathways Internship.
 
Dr. Eric Nielsen received BS and PhD degrees in Aerospace Engineering from Virginia Tech and has worked at Langley for the past 22 years. Dr. Nielsen specializes in the development of computational aerodynamics software for the world’s most powerful computer systems. He has published extensively on the subject and has given presentations around the world on his work. Dr. Nielsen has received NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal and was recently awarded Langley’s 2014 HJE Reid Award for best research publication.


Dr. Manuel Pérez-Quiñones holds a D.Sc. in Computer Science from The George Washington University. On July 1, 2015, Dr. Pérez-Quiñones will begin as Associate Dean of the College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) and Tenured Professor in the Department of Software and Information Systems (SIS) at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (UNCC). While at Virginia Tech he served as Associate Dean of the Graduate School, Associate Department Head and Director of Graduate Studies for the Computer Science Department, and Associate Professor in Computer Science.

SPEAKER

Dr. Lara dos Passos Coggin, Assistant Professor, Department of Focused Inquiry, Office of Learning Innovation and Student Success, Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU)

TITLE

Richmond, Tucson, and Raza Studies: Educational equity and culturally relevant curriculum in U.S. public schools.

WHEN

Friday, April 17, 2015 at 2:30 pm

WHERE

Memorial Hall, James Madison University

HOST

Dr. Kristen McCleary, Associate Professor of History and Coordinator of Cultura y Comunidad at James Madison University

ABSTRACT

Recently, Latina/o communities in the Richmond area have grown, and their presence in the area’s public schools shines a new light on long-standing problems of equity. Tucson public schools, meanwhile, developed in a cultural context including Anglo, American Indian, Mexican-American, African American, and Chinese American influences. The past two decades have seen the rise of Mexican American culturally relevant pedagogy in Tucson, and also its demise, at the hands of Arizona’s state and local officials. A brief comparison of Tucson and Richmond schools can help us explore how their similarities (demographic, educational, and historical) might lead to new ways of thinking about the educational futures of students of color (including African Americans, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and American Indians).

BIO

Dr. Lara dos Passos Coggin joined the Focused Inquiry faculty in the fall of 2012. She conducted her doctoral coursework and research in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Sociocultural Studies, part of the University of Arizona’s College of Education, conducting a mixed-methods study on the 2009 and 2010 Institutes for Transformative Education, created by Tucson Unified School District’s Mexican American Studies Department. She also holds a Master’s in Native American linguistics with an emphasis on Navajo grammar, a Master’s in American Indian Studies, and a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology.